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Andrew Allanson
Registered: 05/11/2012   Last Update: 22/11/2012
Andrew’s training was initially in fine art, and subsequently he studied graphic design, photography and illustration.

Andrew devotes much of his time to what he calls “real painting, which has
become a passion, using traditional materials and techniques”. Also, he still does a certain amount of three dimensional work – sculpture and ceramics. His strong belief is that variety keeps the work lively and interesting. For Andrew, the key to painting as a form of expression is a love of light, colour, composition, and the thrill of revealing the essence of the subject matter as he sees it. “My painting approach is an adaptive one,” he says, “I think it is important to respond to the demands of the subject matter and, if necessary, switch media and techniques in order to best render an atmosphere or mood. Strong design is always something that I seek in an image, and in particular an opportunity to play with perspective in the composition. “My subjects are mainly landscapes, in the widest sense. I also paint architectural subjects, including close-up, more intimate scenes, such as part of a façade with hanging baskets, as in The Window Box and some still life. Essentially, my work is representational, in a semi-impressionistic style. However, depending on the subject matter, occasionally I adopt a slightly tighter, more resolved approach. “I enjoy painting local scenes, around my home in north Wiltshire and the Cotswolds, as well as subjects from more distant locations, particularly from Italy and France. I don’t always specifically travel to places to paint, but I am always looking for interesting subjects. Consequently, when I am on holiday with the rest of the family, very often I will lose them because I have noticed something of interest and stopped to photograph or sketch it! “Light, reflections and shadows are among the qualities that will attract me to a subject. Colour is always important, but that does not necessarily mean that the subject must be very colourful. In fact, the colour can be quite subtle and limited, as in Santa Maria , and still have tremendous impact. I love subjects with water, and this was a particularly atmospheric, moody scene that I wanted to capture. “I am not aware of any notable influences from other artists, although I very much admire the work of many painters, especially Turner. I also like the work of Rowland Hilder, who I think was a tremendous draughtsman with a wonderful sense of design and immense skills in the use of mixed media; Fred Cuming, who has a wonderful eye for colour and tone; and Ken Howard - great technique.”

From an interview by Robin Capon